What’s The 311? Bomb Cyclone Cleanup, Entrance to Charter Street Park Blocked by Snow

Welcome back to our weekly update that highlights some of the cases appearing on 311 in the North End/Waterfront neighborhoods. All 311 cases are public information and can be found at 311.boston.gov.

North Street Sidewalks Not Shoveled Throroughly

“This is just 1 photo of many I took last night. We are 4 days after the snow storm and many of the sidewalks and side streets are notappropriately shoveled or plowed. It is becoming difficult to navigate from place to place. I am fortunate enough to be able to balance and (hopefully) not slip. However I cannot help but think of those who are unable to due to walkers, crutches, wheelchairs, strollers etc. It is dangerous. The sidewalks on Tileston street are barely shoveled, forcing me and other people to use the street as the “safest” place to walk, which itself is not even appropriately plowed. Please help with north end sidewalk clean up and side street plowing!”

Photo taken by 311 on January 10th, six days after the bomb cyclone, of North Street
Photo taken by 311 user on January 8th on North Street

The original 311 post can be found here. This case was submitted and opened on January 8th, 2018.  The case was resolved on January 10th, 2018 with the following message: “Closed with status: Case Noted. No violation found.”

North End Resident Unhappy With Plowing Job in Neighborhood

“This is one of the worst jobs of snow removal on behalf of the city I have seen in the North End. Tileston Street was plowed once at the beginning of the storm and then never touched again. What good is a parking ban when Hanover and Commercial st weren’t plowed to the curb. Would’ve been better off leaving car parked on those streets. City owned sidewalks aren’t shoveled. Boston has seen a foot of snow before in storms and done much better snow removal jobs. This effort was pathetic, not to mention leaving dangerous conditions for cars and pedestrians.”

The original 311 post can be found here. This case was submitted and opened on January 7th, 2018.  The case was resolved on January 8th, 2018 with the following message: “Closed with status: Case Closed. Case Noted.”

 

Massive Snow Pile Blocks Charter Street Park Entrance

Massive Snow Pile Blocks Entrance to Charter Street Park

“Case 101002320313 is NOT resolved. There is still a huge fire hazard snow pile blocking the entrance. Doesn’t seem this was even looked at.”

For Reference, case 101002320313: “HUGE pile of snow blocking a FIRE LANE to Greenough lane. Snow was never placed here until about 2 years ago when the city got more snow than we could handle. Inexcusable for lazy City Suites owner. Please fine them, in addition to correcting the issue. It would be horrific if there was a fire in there. Not to mention this is the back access for that whole block of Hanover Street. Please fine them.”

The original 311 posts can be found here and here. This case was submitted and opened on January 9th, 2018.  The case was resolved on January 10th, 2018 with the following message: “Closed with status: Case Noted. Cited for unshoveled sidewalk.”

Remember, to report a claim with 311, you can call 311, go to the 311 websitetweet at 311, or download the app. What do you think about these 311 cases? Follow our “What’s The 311?” tag to see past week’s postings!


While you’re here …we have a small favor to ask. More people than ever are reading NorthEndWaterfront.com but we need your help making ends meet. Advertising doesn’t bring in enough to pay for reporting or editorial work. Keeping this website going takes a lot of time, money and hard work. But we do it because we believe community news is important – and we think you do too. If everyone who reads this site, who likes it, puts in a bit to pay for it, then our future would be much more secure. Checks can be made out to North End Boston LLC, 343 Commercial St. #508, Boston 02109 or contribute online using the following links:

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What Happened? Sorting Through the January 2018 “Bomb Cyclone” Flood Data and Outlook

So, what happened to cause so much flooding during last week’s winter Nor’easter snow storm? Unlike the near miss of Hurricane Sandy where Boston dodged a (big) bullet, the so called “bomb cyclone” of January 2018 brought a storm surge that hit just at the worst time, an astronomical high tide.

With already over 12 inches of sea level rise since most of Boston was built, more frequent and damaging flooding has been long-predicted by climate change pundits. Not to give away the punchline, but with another 2 feet+ of rising tides in the coming decades, this level of flooding (and worse) will become a regular event, even with normal high tides.

Now, to the numbers. Resident expert Julie Wormer, helps us sort through the data coming out from NOAA, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association. The rest of this post has Julie’s analysis on how the January 4, 2018 tidal surge.

Bottom line: Draft NOAA data on January 4th’s flood show that it was less than an inch higher (0.72″) than during Blizzard of ’78. February 1978’s flood was considered a 1% (“100-year”) flood. Under old calculations, Thursday would also have been a 1% storm; with updated NOAA calculations on what constitutes a 1% flood, Thursday’s storm tide fell short by all of 1.9 inches.

The National Weather Service confirmws that the old record storm tide was 15.1 feet above low tide (mean lower low water) and Thursday’s record storm tide was 15.16 feet above MLLW.

Data wonks, read on–the graphs are still based on the preliminary data on the NOAA website, but they differ from the final data by less than an inch. The numbers are final.

This preliminary NOAA chart displays the storm in terms of feet above mean higher high water (specifically, the long-term average of the higher of the two daily high tides, but you can think of it as feet above high tide). If you want to see this chart based on NAVD, mean sea level or mean lower low water, click here. More explanation below the chart.

The green line is the storm surge.  It stayed close to its peak of three feet for several hours between high and low tide. A three-foot storm surge is not super rare–the fact that it hit at an extra high tide was the problem.

The blue line is the astronomical high tide, which was two feet above normal.  Thursday’s mid-day high tide occurred close to a full moon when the moon was closer to the earth in its orbit.  This “wicked” high tide was only a few inches below what we consider a “King Tide” (i.e., 12.1 feet vs a maximum of about 12.4 feet above mean lower low water),

The red line combines storm surge and tide to indicate final data for the “storm tide” of MHHW plus 4.814 feet, or 0.06 feet (0.72 inches) higher than the Blizzard of ’78 level (MHHW plus 4.754).

With sea level rise, however, NOAA has increased the level of what it considers a 1% flood from 2.95 meters above mean sea level (sorry about all the units!) to 3.02 meters above mean sea level.  The January 4, 2018 flood was 2.971 meters above mean sea level.  This means that it would have counted as a 1% storm between 1983 and 2001, but fell 1.9 inches short of what is considered today’s 1% storm. What this means in less wonky terms is that NOAA recognizes that both sea levels and storm intensity have increased over the last few decades (see below).

Remember, this is all on top of at least a foot of sea level rise since our historical piers were built.  Add two feet of sea level rise to what we have now and we can expect this kind of flooding on an annual basis during winter Nor’easters with normal high tides.


While you’re here …we have a small favor to ask. More people than ever are reading NorthEndWaterfront.com but we need your help making ends meet. Advertising doesn’t bring in enough to pay for reporting or editorial work. Keeping this website going takes a lot of time, money and hard work. But we do it because we believe community news is important – and we think you do too. If everyone who reads this site, who likes it, puts in a bit to pay for it, then our future would be much more secure. Checks can be made out to North End Boston LLC, 343 Commercial St. #508, Boston 02109 or contribute online using the following links:

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Reader Poll: Should Cycle Tracks Receive Priority for Snow Plowing?

In support of year-round bicycling, the City of Boston has prioritized resources toward the plowing and salting of its cycle tracks.

In the latest snowstorm, the Connect Historic Boston cycle track in downtown Boston and the North End was cleared before much of the roadway, city-owned sidewalks, corner curbs and parks. This tweet shows Boston Public Works plowing the cycle track on Staniford Street during last Thursday’s storm:

What do you think? Should the cycle track receive priority for clearing following snow emergencies? Vote in our poll and add your comments in the section below.

Note: Web polls are not scientific, representing only those readers who choose to vote.

Storm Surge Brings Record Flooding to Waterfront Areas [Photos]

Record flooding was seen Thursday afternoon in the North End and the downtown Boston waterfront as a 3 foot storm surge came in with a 12 foot high tide on the harbor.

Flood waters reached the Rose Kennedy Greenway, a first in Boston, and the highest levels since the Blizzard of ’78. The Aquarium T Stop was closed due to flooding and several buildings have been compromised along Atlantic Avenue and Commercial Street with significant water intrusions. Causeway Street was also closed most of the day with flooding at Lovejoy Wharf and Beverly Street. Some buildings lost power, including Lincoln Wharf, and thousands were left without internet or TV service.

The Boston Fire Department rescued some caught by the fast moving surge around Long Wharf and the Aquarium. Fortunately, we have not heard of significant injuries from the storm. BFD setup a center of operations at the Marriott Long Wharf.

Commercial Wharf parking lot flooding (photo by Teresa Mirabito)

https://twitter.com/MBTA/status/948977593281404928

Parked cars at Sargent’s Wharf are also surrounded by flood waters. (Photo by Frankie Boyer)

Commercial Wharf photo by Teresa Mirabito.

The low lying areas are being hit the hardest along Atlantic Avenue, Long Wharf, Aquarium, and many of the North End wharves. Officials have closed much of Atlantic Avenue where some pedestrians had to be rescued.

https://twitter.com/b911nature/status/949082172182401024

It’s also hitting other waterfront neighborhoods, including the Seaport and East Boston.

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Water has entered the park 😯

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While you’re here …we have a small favor to ask. More people than ever are reading NorthEndWaterfront.com but we need your help making ends meet. Advertising doesn’t bring in enough to pay for reporting or editorial work. Keeping this website going takes a lot of time, money and hard work. But we do it because we believe community news is important – and we think you do too. If everyone who reads this site, who likes it, puts in a bit to pay for it, then our future would be much more secure. Checks can be made out to North End Boston LLC, 343 Commercial St. #508, Boston 02109 or contribute online using the following links:

*Make a One-Time Contribution* or *Become a Patron*

Snow Emergency Continues into Friday as Cleanup Begins

https://twitter.com/b911nature/status/949082172182401024

As the storm moves out, the recovery efforts continue from the record flooding and 12+ inches of snow. Here are some updates.

Trash will be picked up on Friday, but city officials are urging residents to put it clearly out by the curb. Schools are closed again with the Nazzaro Center open. The North End library and City Hall will also be open. Property owners have until about 10:15 a.m. to clear their sidewalks. The parking ban continues into Friday as well. Boston Fire Department and Inspectional Services will be out to further deal with flooded areas and check compromised buildings. See more details from the City below.

MAYOR WALSH ANNOUNCES CONTINUED PREPARATIONS, SNOW EMERGENCY, SCHOOL CLOSURES FOR WINTER STORM
Urges residents to take caution, abide by snow emergency regulations
BOSTON – Thursday, January 4, 2018 – Mayor Martin J. Walsh today announced the city’s continued preparations for the ongoing winter storm, which is expected to bring 12 to 18 inches of snow and strong winds by around 9:00 p.m. tonight, with freezing cold temperatures lasting all weekend. Boston’s Emergency Operations Center is running and will be monitoring the storm.
“As always, safety is our number one priority. We are encouraging residents to stay off the roads, assist the elderly and disabled, and be sure to use caution during the cold weather,” said Mayor Walsh. “Please remember to abide by safety guidelines, call 3-1-1 with any questions, and be safe.”
Updates:
  • Boston Public Schools will be closed on Friday, January 5.
  • All Boston Centers for Youth & Families (BCYF) community centers will be open on Friday, including stand-alone centers and school-based sites.
  • A snow emergency and parking ban remains in effect throughout the duration of the storm.
  • City Hall and all libraries will be open tomorrow, and all employees should report to work.
  • Crews from Boston Water and Sewer, the Boston Fire Department and Inspectional Services are monitoring flooding in neighborhoods.
  • Sidewalks should be shoveled by 3 hours after dawn tomorrow, at about 10:15 a.m.
Discounted parking is available for Boston residents in garages and lots throughout city, and residents will have two hours to move their cars once the parking ban is lifted. Locations and pricing are available at Boston.gov/snow. Residents are encouraged to stay off the roads, and take public transportation if needed. Emergency personnel who need transport, such as doctors and nurses, are encouraged to call 3-1-1 to be connected.
Boston Public Works has 40,000 tons of rock salt ready to be distributed, and today has over 750 pieces of equipment on the roads. The city’s main focus continues to be on clearing sidewalks, main streets, roadways and responding to public requests for plowing and salting. Boston Police and EMS has an increased presence and will be ready to assist people in every neighborhood.
Residents are encouraged to sign up for emergency notifications through AlertBoston and utilize the 311 call center for non-emergency related issues. 311 is operational 24 hours a day, and will have extra staff tomorrowto respond to calls. To find out more information about resources and services available to residents, please visit boston.gov/snow.
Safety Tips
  • Shoveling snow requires significant exertion; please be cautious and pay attention to symptoms. Stop if you feel chest pain, shortness of breath, light headed, nauseous/vomiting. Call 911 if those symptoms do not resolve quickly when you stop exertion.
  • Snow piles can make navigating intersections dangerous for walkers and drivers; please take extra care when turning corners with snow piles that might limit visibility.
  • Pedestrians should use caution as visibility will be diminished due to blowing and drifting of the snow caused by high winds.
  • Carbon monoxide poisoning is a concern during winter weather, especially with the use of generators. Residents should be sure to use their home heating systems wisely and safety, and have a working carbon monoxide detector on each floor of your home. Call 911 immediately if you suspect carbon monoxide poisoning.
  • Sitting in a car while idling can be deadly if the tailpipe is blocked. Do not let children sit in an idling car while shoveling. Clear any household exhaust pipes of snow. For example, gas exhaust from heating system or dryer.
  • Remember to clear snow away from all vents around their homes to avoid health risks.
  • Remember to keep catch basins and fire hydrants clear.
  • Please check on neighbors, especially the elderly and disabled.
  • Have a contractor check the roof to see if snow needs to be removed. If roof snow can be removed from the ground with the use of a snow-rake, do so with caution. Avoid working from ladders and be mindful of slippery surfaces.
  • To help keep pipes from freezing, keep the faucet dripping a little bit, and don’t turn your heaters off.
Rules on Clearing Snow
  • Property owners must clear snow, sleet and ice from sidewalks and curb ramps abutting the property within three hours after the snowfall ends or three hours after sunrise if it snows overnight. Failure to comply will result in a fine issued by Boston Public Works Code Enforcement.
  • Please clear at least a 42-inch-wide path for people using wheelchairs and strollers.
  • Removal of snow, ice from a private property to the street or sidewalk is prohibited and will result in a fine issued by Boston Public Works Code Enforcement.
  • Do not throw snow onto the street.
  • Please look here for information about fines associated with improper removal of snow.
Space Savers
  • 48-hour space saver rule is in effect: residents have 48 hours to use an object to save a parking spot after a snow emergency has ended.
  • After 48 hours, space savers must be removed.
  • Due to a community decision, space savers are not allowed in the South End. Space savers are allowed in every other neighborhood.
Community Centers
Boston Centers for Youth & Families Community Centers will be open during normal business hours. Please check their schedules here.
Helping the Homeless
  • If you see homeless individuals out  in the cold who appear immobile, disoriented or underdressed for the cold, please call 911.
  • The Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC) coordinates a city-wide network of emergency shelters, outreach providers, city agencies and first responders to assist those in need of shelter.
  • Emergency shelters are open 24 hours and will accept any person in need. Men can access shelters through 112 Southampton Street, and women should go to the Woods-Mullen Shelter at 794 Massachusetts Ave. BPHC and the city are working closely with shelter providers to ensure that no client is without shelter, food, resources, and a warm respite from the cold.
  • During extreme cold weather, street outreach teams will continue to provide support to homeless individuals in need.
Residents are encouraged to sign-up for AlertBoston to receive emergency alerts and to call 311, download the BOS:311 app , or Tweet at @BOS311with questions or concerns. Follow @CityofBoston and boston.gov/snow for the latest updates.
###

Boston Blizzard Updates: 8-12 Inches, 50+ mph Winds

  • Boston Public Schools are closed Thursday (and maybe Friday).
  • BCYF Community Centers, including the Nazzaro Center, are open 7:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
  • Parking ban beginning Thursday, Jan. 4th at 7 am.
  • Street cleaning is cancelled.
  • North End Public Safety meeting is cancelled.
  • Snow emergency means space savers are fair game!

Parking:

  • The City of Boston is putting into effect a Snow Emergency and Parking Ban on main roads.
  • You will be ticketed and towed if you park on a posted snow emergency artery during a declared snow emergency.
  • Please park at least 20 feet away from intersections and no farther than 1 foot from the curb. Don’t block sidewalks, fire hydrants, ramps, driveways or the street with your vehicle.
  • Discounted parking will be available in City garages. Locations and pricing information can be found at: Boston.gov/snow.
  • Residents are encouraged to stay off the roads, and take public transportation if needed.

Rules on Clearing Snow:

Property owners must clear snow, sleet and ice from sidewalks and curb ramps abutting the property within three hours after the snowfall ends or three hours after sunrise if the snow ends overnight. Failure to comply can result in a fine issued by PWD’s Code Enforcement Division.

Do not throw snow onto the street. Fines associated with improper removal of snow can be found here.

You can report an unshoveled sidewalk to the City of Boston via 311:

HOW TO USE 311 (24 hours a day, 7 days a week)

  • CALL – Dial 311 within Boston city limits. You can also call 617-635-4500.
  • USE THE WEBSITE – Available online at Boston.gov/311.
  • USE THE APP – Download the app for iOS or Android.
  • TWEET – Tweet a request @BOS311 with  information, location and a photo.

Call 911 for public safety issues, police or fire.

TRASH

Please clear an area at the curb, or put containers next to or in front of snow banks.

IMPORTANT PHONE NUMBERS

COPP’S HILL MOMENT: First Snow

One recent morning we awoke to the first snow of winter coating the lindens and elms on Copp’s Hill. The holiday calendar season had now officially arrived although the mad rush of getting and spending was already well underway. But, for that brief moment at dawn, the sounds of traffic, sirens and construction were muffled in a soft falling whiteness. All was calm, all was bright in the neighborhood as each of us made our way towards December 25.

On Christmas eve in buildings encircling an ancient burying ground, a cluster of families, including our own, will shelter in place, foregoing the exodus to the suburbs, mountains and beyond.  For some of us, the holidays make impossible demands, conjuring up childhood memories that collide with the reality of adult responsibility. But for one brief night — perhaps for a handful of hours — we find emotional refuge.

Maybe the Bethlehem Star will be cloud covered and the echoing of angel voices muted deep within the cityscape. Perhaps the magi’s caravan will encounter a detour somewhere along the turnpike. As we slumber, Herod’s soldiers will not yet have received orders to arm and mount. There will be only calm. There will be serenity. There will be respite from the last darkness of the passing year and the uncertainty of the one about to begin. Still we cling to hope in the humanity of our brothers and sisters and seek peace everywhere as we journey through this season.

Thomas F. Schiavoni

(From Boston’s North End, Thomas F. Schiavoni  writes about neighborhood life and city living.)

Social Highlights This Week: First Snow & Sweet Treats

Check out our weekly social media highlights from residents, visitors, and more in the area. To be featured, tag us @northend.waterfront on Instagram, @northendboston on Twitter, @northendwaterfront on Facebook. Use hashtags #northendboston or #bostonwaterfront.

First Snow Fall

 

Sweet Treats

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Tis the season for sweet treats! 😋

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While you’re here …we have a small favor to ask. More people than ever are reading NorthEndWaterfront.com but we need your help making ends meet. Advertising doesn’t bring in enough to pay for reporting or editorial work. Keeping this website going takes a lot of time, money and hard work. But we do it because we believe community news is important – and we think you do too. If everyone who reads this site, who likes it, puts in a bit to pay for it, then our future would be much more secure. Checks can be made out to North End Boston LLC, 343 Commercial St. #508, Boston 02109 or contribute online using the following links:

*Make a One-Time Contribution* or *Become a Patron*

Neighborhood Photos: First Snow in the Boston’s North End

Saturday brought the first snow of the season in Boston’s North End!

And, there’s still a line at Giacomo’s on Hanover Street.

Snowman on the waterfront. (Photo by Dave MacDowell)

Snow at Lewis. (Photo by Jon Campanelli)

“Glamping” through the North End. (Photo by Dr. Joe Mendola)

 

 

“Neighborhood Photo” is a regular feature on NorthEndWaterfront.com. Submit your interesting photos using our Submit a Post form or tag @northend.waterfront on Instagram. Please include a caption or story telling us about your photo.

See past neighborhood photo posts.

Wednesday’s Briefing: Snow Day Scenes, Btone Fitness Growth, DiMasi Off House Arrest?

Things to know for Wednesday!

Snow Day scenes from the North End:

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Spring ride in Boston ………. not!

A post shared by Jose Duarte (@chefjduarte) on

Articles you won’t want to miss:

DiMasi seeking to get off home confinement after getting sprung from jail

Salvatore DiMasi, the former Speaker of the House, is on rebound from cancer at the age of 71. Citing that his oncologist and his cardiologist recommended he sticks to a strict exercise program for his overall health, this request comes four months after being let out of prison two years earlier, continue reading at the Boston Herald.

New England Aquarium names interim CEO

This past Monday, an interim Chief Executive was hired to The New England Aquarium and will begin as of April 1, 2017. Replacing Nigella Hillgarth will be Maliz Beams, a longtime financial sector executive and a board member at the aquarium, The Boston Globe has more on the story.

This boutique fitness studio opened six locations in six years and isn’t slowing down

The fitness scene has certainly emerged around Boston, and so has Btone Fitness, a Lagree Fitness Method that continues to be a popular workout across the country. Boston has had this trendy method since 2010, with the focus on the legs, core, and arms done slowly, Boston.com has more on this fitness craze.

Plan your events with the Community Calendar

Wednesday, March 15

10:30am Sing-along with Matt Heaton at West End Library. Matt Heaton performs goofy and gleeful “Toddlerbilly” music! No registration required. Groups and individuals welcome. Located at 151 Cambridge St, Boston.

6:30pm Article 80 Information Session at Harvard Kent School, Charlestown. Boston Planning & Development Agency (BPDA) staff will be providing an overview of the Article 80 development review process. After a presentation by BPDA staff, a question and answer session will follow. The public is encouraged to attend. Harvard-Kent Elementary School, 50 Bunker Hill St, Charlestown, MA.

Thursday, March 16

6:00pm Old North Foundation Speaker Series: Roaring through the Ages: The Emancipation of Women in the Law, 1976-2016. Located at Old North Church, 193 Salem St, Boston, Carol Ball will be the featured speaker, the event is co-sponsored by the Nichols House Museum. Tickets: “pay what you will” donation. More information.

Friday, March 17

12:00pm PolkaDog Pup Crawl at PolkaDog. PolkaDog Pup Craw! Noon to 6pm – Swing by the PolkaDog on Salem Street for some St. Patty’s Day fun with your pup! Located at 57 Salem St, Boston.

3:00pm Step Dancing at Faneuil Hall. What better way to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day in Boston than with Irish Step Dancers! Join Step About Boston, Boston University’s only Irish Step Dancing club, in the West End of Quincy Market (near the Salty Dog).

6:00pm Stefano De Angelis – ISIS vs. West. After years of war against terrorism, led by the United States and its allies, mainly against Al Qaeda and its international network, today the West is in war with an enemy of a very different caliber and capabilities: ISIS. [I AM Books, 189 North St, Boston].

From the Community:

Curator’s Tour of Otis House. Otis House not only tells the story of one house over time on Beacon Hill, it also showcases some of Historic New England’s best Boston-made furniture. Join Senior Curator of Collections Nancy Carlisle as she offers an in-depth look at some of these treasures. Registration Required – more information.

Need to submit a post? Great, start here!

Keep up with what’s happening on the Events Calendar.

Weather Forecast:

Currently
Currently
Currently

Did we miss something? Add it to the comments below. Follow @northend.waterfront on Instagram and tag #northend or #bostonwaterfront to have your photo featured!


While you’re here …we have a small favor to ask. More people than ever are reading NorthEndWaterfront.com but we need your help making ends meet. Advertising doesn’t bring in enough to pay for reporting or editorial work. Keeping this website going takes a lot of time, money and hard work. But we do it because we believe community news is important – and we think you do too. If everyone who reads this site, who likes it, puts in a bit to pay for it, then our future would be much more secure.

Make a One-Time Contribution or Become a Patron


Snow Emergency: Parking, Shoveling & School Closure Information

PREPARATIONS, SNOW EMERGENCY, SCHOOL CLOSURES FOR WINTER STORM
Tuesday’s winter storm is anticipated to bring up to 12 inches of snow to Boston. Snow will be heavy, and will bring poor visibility and winds up to 20-30 miles per hour, with gusts up to 60 miles per hour. Boston’s Emergency Operations Center will activate at 7 a.m. Tuesday and will monitor the storm over the course of its duration. The National Weather Service has issued a winter storm warning, in effect from 5 a.m. tomorrow morning until 5 p.m.
“We are encouraging residents to stay off the roads during the storm, to assist older residents and those with disabilities, and to keep up with the shoveling of their property throughout the storm tomorrow,” said Mayor Walsh. “The City offers a number of resources geared towards keeping residents safe and aware of current conditions. I ask each and every single Boston resident to remain vigilant, stay safe and look after their neighbors.”
Closures:
  • Boston Public Schools will be closed on Tuesday in anticipation of the storm.
  • Boston Centers for Youth & Families (BCYF) stand-alone community centers will be open, with school-based sites closed.
  • Boston Public Libraries will be closed.
  • For City of Boston employees, only public safety, emergency management and snow operations personnel are required to report to work tomorrow.
Parking:
  • The City of Boston is putting into effect a Snow Emergency and Parking Ban on main roads beginning at 7 a.m. tomorrow.
  • Discounted parking will be available in City garages. Locations and pricing information can be found at: Boston.gov/snow.
  • Residents are encouraged to stay off the roads, and take public transportation if needed.

Preparations:

  • The Public Works Department (PWD) will begin pre-treating roadways prior to dawn.
  • PWD will have over 700 pieces of equipment treating roads and plowing snow during the height of the storm.
  • PWD will have over 30,000 tons of salt available.
  • Trash and recycling collection will begin at 5 a.m. for Tuesday pickups.
  • Street-sweeping is cancelled both Monday night and Tuesday day.
Rules on Clearing Snow:
  • Property owners must clear snow, sleet and ice from sidewalks and curb ramps abutting the property within three hours after the snowfall ends or three hours after sunrise if the snow ends overnight. Failure to comply can result in a fine issued by PWD’s Code Enforcement Division.
  • Removal of snow, ice from a private property to the street or sidewalk is prohibited and can result in a fine issued by PWD’s Code Enforcement Division.
  • Do not throw snow onto the street. Fines associated with improper removal of snow can be found here.

Safety Tips
  • Shoveling snow requires significant exertion; please be cautious and pay attention to symptoms. Stop if you feel chest pain, shortness of breath, lightheaded, nauseous/vomiting. Call 911 if those symptoms do not resolve quickly when you stop exertion.
  • Snow piles can make navigating intersections dangerous for walkers and drivers, please take extra care when turning corners with snow piles that might limit visibility.
  • Pedestrians should use caution as visibility will be diminished due to blowing and drifting of the snow caused by high winds.
  • Carbon Monoxide poisoning is a concern during winter weather, especially with the use of generators. Residents should be sure to use their home heating systems wisely and safety, and have a working carbon monoxide detector on each floor of your home. Call 911 immediately if you suspect carbon monoxide poisoning.
  • Sitting in a car while idling can be deadly if the tailpipe is blocked. Do not let children sit in an idling car while shoveling. Clear any household exhaust pipes of snow. For example, gas exhaust from heating system or dryer.
  • Remember to keep catch basins and fire hydrants clear.  For a map of catch basins and fire hydrants, visit http://www.bwsc.org/
  • Please check on neighbors, especially the elderly and disabled.
  • Have a contractor check the roof to see if snow needs to be removed. If roof snow can be removed from the ground with the use of a snow-rake, do so with caution. Avoid working from ladders and be mindful of slippery surfaces.
Helping the Homeless:
  • If you see homeless individuals out in the cold who appear immobile, disoriented or underdressed for the cold, please call 911.
  • The Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC) coordinates a city-wide network of emergency shelters, outreach providers, city agencies and first responders to assist those in need of shelter.
  • Emergency shelters are open 24 hours and will accept any person in need. Men can access shelters through 112 Southampton Street, and women should go to the Woods-Mullen Shelter at 794 Massachusetts Ave. BPHC and the City are working closely with shelter providers to ensure that no client is without shelter, food, resources, and a warm respite from the cold.
  • Emergency shelters are open 24 hours and will accept any person in need.
  • During extreme cold weather, street outreach teams operate with extended hours and provide mobile outreach vans on the streets in the evening and throughout the day. Find more information  here.
Residents are encouraged to sign up for emergency notifications through AlertBoston and utilize the 311 call center for non-emergency related issues. Please follow @CityofBoston and visit boston.gov/snow for the latest updates.