This week, we found some links to the best ways to park in the neighborhood, a “day in the life” at the Improv and an alternative perspective on bike lanes. Also, a Wall Street Journal article highlights the “gentrifying” statistics behind the housing market boom in Boston from 2000 to 2007. The Living Room chimes in on red tape and our own library helps promote literacy efforts for blind children.

Parking on Hanover Street (Boston.com)

Locals give tips on dealing with horrible North End parking
Having trouble finding parking in the neighborhood? Whether you believe in parking in a garage or driving around the narrow streets searching for a spot, get parking tips from the ones who know it best. Read more at Boston.com

F.H. Buckley: We Have Not Yet Begun to Fight the Bike Lanes
Interested in learning about bike lane issues nation wide? If you have concerns about bike lanes in the North End, get a perspective about these issues from other cities in the United States. Read more at The Wall Street Journal

Improv Asylum's very own, Matt Catanzano. Photo by Bostinno
Improv Asylum’s very own, Matt Catanzano. (Bostinno)

A Day in the Life of Improv Asylum Actor, Director & Writer Matt Catanzano
A big fan of Hanover Street’s Improv Asylum? Bostinno’s series “A Day in the Life” features one of Boston’s top comedy venue stars, Matt Catanzano, the Asylum’s full time writer, director, and teacher. Check out what his daily lifestyle is, in the Asylum and in his spare time. Read more at Bostinno

Number of the Week: The Benefits of Gentrification
Upset about how the face of neighborhoods change over time? It’s worth your while to see the economic benefits and how it benefits original residents. According to new research from the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, Boston’s low-priced areas gentrified 61% from 2000 to 2007, the largest proportion among major U.S. cities. Read more at The Wall Street Journal

Small businesses get tangled in red tape in Boston
This editorial explores the rigorous process that restaurants, breweries, and small businesses face trying to start here in Boston due to the amount of “red tape they face.” John and Francie Hauck write that they have opened four businesses of various types in Boston, one in Rhode Island, and two in Germany and Italy. Boston is the most difficult of all in which do business, when it comes to permits and licensing. Read more at The Boston Globe

Braille Story Time at the North End Library
On Tuesday morning, the North End Public Library hosted Hands On! Hosted by The National Braille Press, an organization dedicated to promoting the literacy of blind children and empowering blind people to engage in the community. The group invited 3- to 5-year-old children to listen to stories read by blind volunteers, as part of October Blind Awareness Month. Read more at Boston.com

Did you come across an interesting North End / Waterfront related article? Email the link to us at info@northendwaterfront.com.