This week’s post about the Quincy House is brought to you by the Boston Landmarks Commission. Check it out below!

The old Quincy House, which once stood on Brattle Street in the famous Scollay Square neighborhood, is the star of this week's #TornDownTuesday. This building was constructed of granite around 1819, making it the first of its kind in Boston, soon to be followed by Quincy Market. In the 1880's, a renovation took place that added a clock tower and an additional three stories, hosting a grand total of 500 rooms The building, constructed on the site of where the first Quaker meeting house in Boston was located, rose to prominence in the local community by not only becoming a popular hotel, but also by hosting a variety of labor union meetings in their function halls. Laborers and politicians alike spent ample time in these halls, which the hotel eventually became widely recognized for. As labor patronage began to decline in the early 20th century, so did the hotel's popularity. In addition to this, new hotels being built in the area overshadowed the Quincy House which led to the establishment closing down in 1929. After they closed down, various local businesses such as the Suffolk Savings Bank and the First National Bank of Boston acquired parcels of the building, but it could not save the building from demolition in 1935. Relative to today's architecture, the eastern edge of where the old Quincy House once stood is now the entrance of Boston City Hall. #Boston #QuincyHouse #Architecture #Demolished #History #Hotel #CityOfBoston

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Hover over the image and then use the arrows to scroll through and see two additional photos. The Quincy House served as a hotel throughout the 19th century, as well as the location of many labor union meetings. At one point, the hotel actually advertised itself as the “official headquarters for organized labor” in Boston.

The third photo shows an old map with the Quincy House on the corner of Brattle Street and Brattle Square. This location is now part of City Hall Plaza, at the entrance to City Hall.

Tune in on Thursday’s to view our featured neighborhood photo from back in the day! Submit your historical photos using our Submit a Post form or tag @northend.waterfront on Instagram. Please include a caption or story telling about your photo.

See past historic neighborhood photo posts.


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