From gondolas to MBTA woes, Boston is always brainstorming the next big infrastructure project for the city. Whether it’s extending the subway, connecting trains, or building tunnels, everyone has opinions and ideas, many of which have been talked about for years. WBUR recently posted an article highlighting some of these long talked about plans, including an idea to turn the now closed North Avenue Bridge into a site comparable to New York City’s High-Line.

What do you think should be Boston’s next infrastructure project? Vote in our poll and add your comments in the section below.

Note: Web polls are not scientific, representing only those readers who choose to vote.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

10 COMMENTS

    • It was considered. The Reagan Administration forced Governor Dukakis to drop it as a condition of receiving federal funding for the project. The idea has been in the works since 1916 though!

  1. The city/state should not spend money on “new” infrastructure. They should spend that money upgrading our current infrastructure.

  2. How about just maintaining what we have to a higher and more reliable standard before building new infrastructure? Have you been down in the sewer that used to be called the Aquarium T Station lately? What a disgrace for the City of Boston! Fix what we have and maintain it before building more infrastructure that will never be maintained. Potholes anyone?

    • They did do a lot of improvement to that stop. They got rid of the escalator with teeth, that ate small children. This is the first time that I can remember that it flooded. Flooding on the. Green Line used to be more common. As the flooding gets worse fixing the trains has to be part of a larger problem resolution. Our new problem is flooding. we might be looking at New Orleans type flood control projects.

  3. All of these projects need to be completed as soon as possible. Raise taxes. We cannot survive without rapid transportation.

  4. The old Northern Avenue Bridge has remained open for tall boats to go through. Why? How many boats actually use it? I would rather it be kept for foot traffic. Foot traffic would bring more people to the Seaport area in a convenient way to eat at the many restaurants the Seaport area has to offer. Right now, not many people who live on the Boston proper waterfront patronize the Seaport restaurants.

Comments are closed.