This weekly roundup of articles was scavenged from countless news sources and boiled down into one convenient post!

Post-Gazette's publisher and editor Pamela Donnaruma, photo by Webb Chappell. Courtesy of Boston Magazine.
Post-Gazette’s publisher and editor Pamela Donnaruma, photo by Webb Chappell. Courtesy of Boston Magazine.

Pamela Donnaruma on the Post-Gazette’s Future

Pamela Donnaruma took over the Post-Gazette in 1990, almost a century after her Italian-immigrant grandfather, James, founded La Gazzetta del Massachusetts in 1896. One of our country’s oldest ethnic newspapers still in existence, the Post-Gazette offices are now a living history. With no children to pass the publication along to, read more on the uncertain future of the Post-Gazette’s future at, Boston Magazine.

Sal DiMasi to have pension contributions returned

Despite his conviction on federal corruption charges, the Supreme Judicial Court ruled in favor of former House speaker Salvatore F. DiMasi to collect $127,010 plus about five years in interest from the state retirement board. The ruling was unanimous that the retirement board wrongly denied him access to the money for those years, continue reading at, The Boston Globe.

The 3-pound Giambotta with everything at Regina Pizzeria. Photo by Lane Turner, Boston.com
The 3-pound Giambotta with everything at Regina Pizzeria. Photo by Lane Turner, Boston.com.

These are the most popular pizza places in Boston and Cambridge

Boston has a long pride with pizza, with some of the oldest pizza places in the country from East Boston to the North End, but there are some newcomers on the block taking the top spots. Data from restaurant check-in app Swarm placed Regina Pizzeria at number three, see what spots topped the list at, Boston.com.

Boston councilor wants to lower city speed limit

The Boston City Council met with city transportation officials to discuss lowering the speed limit in Boston to 20 mph. Leading the discussion was City Councilor Frank Baker from Dorchester, who says that a 30-mile-per-hour speed limit might work in smaller towns, where the houses are spread out, but not in a neighborhood such as the North End where the streets are narrow, continue reading at, The Boston Globe.

The North End in Two Hours: What to See When You Don’t Have All Day

With the North End being one of Boston’s most famous neighborhoods, how could one possibly take in all the neighborhood has to offer while still having time to see other parts of Boston? By prioritizing the top five destinations, such as the Paul Revere House, exploring Hanover Street, Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Birthplace, The Old North Church, and more, continue reading the article at Boston Curbed.

A Skinny Hotel Plan Surfaces

Boston’s real estate boom seems like it is hitting almost every corner of the city, and it may be true with this latest development proposal. The corner parcel at 88 North Washington Street is currently a parking lot, but is planned to become the site of a 15 story, 74-room hotel. Read the article at, Banker & Tradesman.

Photo by Adam Castiglioni, courtesy of UniversalHub.
Photo by Adam Castiglioni.

People who live in glass houses can no longer dream of moving to Faneuil Hall

“Glass houses” is referring to the old Faneuil Hall Marketplace greenhouse, which was recently demolished to be most likely be replaced with, “something that better benefits our world-class tourist destination.” More on the story at, UniversalHub.

Purple bridge

“The Zakim lit up like it’s 1999,” referring to the Zakim Bridge in Boston being lit purple in honor of Prince, who passed away. View the photo at, UniversalHub.

About The Greenway:

The new sculptures on the Greenway each weigh around 800 pounds. Photo by Lane Turner, The Boston Globe.
The new sculptures on the Greenway each weigh around 800 pounds. Photo by Lane Turner, The Boston Globe.

Boston’s Greenway has new residents, but what are they?

Ai Wei Wei’s Chinese zodiac sculptures were installed on the Rose Kennedy Greenway near Milk Street, weighing in around 800 pounds. Consisting of 12 bronze-cast, pole-mounted animal heads, each of them representing a sign of the Chinese zodiac, read more on the Greenway’s latest pursuit of public art  sculptures at, The Boston Globe.

The Greenway gets fierce

Representing the 12 signs of the Chinese zodiac, the Rose Kennedy Greenway installed work by Ai Weiwei, consisting of a snarling dog head and other animal heads, view more at, UniversalHub.

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