150 North Street
150 North Street

The Boston Herald’s Thomas Grillo interviews North End developer, Matteo Gallo, about the empty buildings at 150 North St. and 130 Richmond St. discussed last week in the paper.

Gallo said the North St. building along the Greenway with the small gold dome, could be a boutique hotel or residential units. The Richmond St. building is the former city printing building that was recently shut down. The North Bennet Street School has also expressed interest in that location.

The article also mentions Gallo as the buyer of 11 Sheafe Street, a 16-unit residential building, sold at auction for $5.1 million in mid-December.

The builder is also in the midst of an application review for 234 Hanover Street with a proposal for 22 apartments.

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7 COMMENTS

  1. IS THERE NO WAY TO STOP GALLO FROM THIS PUSH TO OWN EVERYTHING AND TURN THIS INTO SOME EPCOT CENTER VERSION OF LA OR NYC? WE DON'T NEED A BOUTIQUE HOTEL OR MORE CONDOS OR APARTMENTS. HOW MANY MORE PEOPLE THEN THE 13,000 WHO ARE CRAMMED INTO THIS 1.1 SQ. MILE NEIGHBORHOOD CAN WE HANDLE. ENOUGH. I WOULD RATHER SEE HIM TAKE HIS GRANDIOSE PLANS TO ARLINGTON INSTEAD OF FORCING THE WORLD FAMOUS NORTH BENNETT ST SCHOOL PACK UP AND LEAVE BECAUSE THEY CAN'T FIND SPACE TO ACCOMMODATE THEIR GROWING PROGRAMS? ENOUGH WITH THE CONDOS RESTAURANTS, HOTELS, HIGH PRICED APARTMENTS.

  2. Lovely. With the local public school bursting at the seams, the city wants to sell this property. Leaving NBSS aside – frankly, they've been a bit ambiguous about NOT wanting to relocate everything to Arlington, where they already hold many of their larger classes – there is a great need for a new public school to service the North End, Downtown, West End and Beacon Hill areas. The City has to keep in mind that changing demographics have once more brought families into these zones, families in the shrinking middle class that cannot afford high-priced private schooling. Charlestown has no more space in its school district, nor does the Quincy, that has to service the South End as well. Even St. John's has 30 kids in its K-1 class this year, they can't take any more. Some area kids last year were assigned to Roxbury – including a long bus ride to and from the site, and now they have to be reassigned since their schools are closing/merging.

  3. Time to start lobbying the Mayor, City Councilor Sal L, State Rep Aaron M and State Senator Anthony P to support a new public school or the NBSS (which has been interested in the old printing bldg for years because the DIrector wants everything to be in the North End). Certainly not a hotel or expensive condos or apartments.

  4. How about an RFP and the varying groups can put forth well developed ideas??? I think a united NBSS could be great, but I don't want some sweetheart deal with OUR City owned property. Let some sunshine in!

  5. It would seem to me that the logical thing to do would have the city work out terms so the school could purchase the building.
    There are plenty of vacant condos and apartments in the north end for sale or rent. What the north end needs is more affordable school space. Between the Elliott and North Bennett the north end now offers children a first class education.
    Families make a community thrive and the more families that live and shop in the north end the stronger the community. We must take a longer time horizan view and not a short term view.
    Great schools plus a wonderful neighborhood library can only benefit this great community. I don't see the great benefit in another half sold condo development, restaurant or small hotel.
    I know 2011 is the year I am going to make the right decisions and I hope our government does too.

  6. @Bill: FYI

    While the NBSS offers a woodworking program with the Elliot School it is really a world renowned trade/craftmanship school for adults.

    About North Bennet Street School
    An Education in Craftsmanship
    Located in Boston, Massachusetts, North Bennet Street School offers intensive, hands-on training in traditional trades and fine craftsmanship, helping students to achieve meaningful lives and livelihoods. For more than a century, our exceptional programs, master faculty, and inspiring community have encouraged individual growth, curiosity, technical mastery, and commitment to excellence. Today, the school's reputation for excellence and value attracts students from around the world.

    At NBSS, we teach and uphold the principles and practices of the craftsmanship tradition — including skillful use of hand tools and power equipment, informed choice of appropriate materials, creative problem-solving grounded in knowledge of the best solutions of the craft, and complete dedication to the highest quality of work. Our intensive programs and workshops provide a transformative experience for people who share a passion for materials, creative work, and careers that employ the intelligence of hands to produce objects that last.

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