FlavorsoftheNorthEnd.com is featuring a video taken a few years ago of John Rega interviewing the North End’s Vincenzo DiGangi, former publisher of Boston’s North End Magazine. “This walking tour brought back memories of my past when I was a child growing up in the North & West End of Boston. During the 20th Century, this area was the beginning for many europeans who were destined to find their place in America.”

John, a.k.a. Angie’s son, was raised in the North End, with his relatives, the Fuccillo and De La Rosa families, who are still an important part of the community. Vincenzo DiGangi takes John back to the streets where he played “aggies” on water department man-hole covers.

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Click to view the video at FlavorsOfTheNorthEnd.com.

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1 COMMENT

  1. Hello, John and Vincenzo,
    My grandfather, Louis Goldstein came to Boston from Lithuania in the mid-1880s. Around 1888, he opened a tiny "hole-in-the-wall" shoe store/cobbler shop in the North End. Around 1893, he had a thriving shoe store at 213 Hanover Street in the North End. My mother said there was a police station next door, and that my grandfather would sell "bulldog-toed" policeman shoes to the cops, most of whom were Irish. The neighborhood was almost wholly Italian. Mother also remembered the paddy wagon at the police station, and its clanging bell. I live in the San Francisco Bay Area, but used to work for Beacon Hill publishers way back in the 1960s. I occasionally visit Boston, and hope to again in the next couple of years. I just wondered if you know anything about my grandfather’s shoe store at 213 Hanover Street. Thanks! LindaJay

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