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Weekly Top Reads: Open Businesses Directory, Tenement Life Part 2, Street Photos During COVID-19, Emergency Rental Relief, & Speak for the Trees

This week’s top posts on NorthEndWaterfront.com, despite another week of social distancing due to COVID-19, featured a little bit of everything—businesses, history, housing, photos, nature, and more! Read on below to see the most popular articles from this past week.

We’re Open! North End / Waterfront Business Listing

The North End/Waterfront Neighborhood Council (NEWNC) has started a listing of local restaurants and cafes, shops and boutiques, liquor stores, animal and child care services, etc. that are open and offering services during the COVID-19 outbreak. Enter a business and view the whole list here.


Life On The Corner: Tenement Life Part 2—Gentrification

North End tenements 1930 – 1939 (Courtesy of Boston Public Library)

Lifelong North Ender and columnist Nicholas Dello Russo shares the second part of his story “Tenement Life”, reflecting on neighborhood life in the 1940s and how everything began to change with the urban renewal and gentrification. Read the story here.

Photo Gallery: Boston’s Empty Streets During The COVID-19 Pandemic

Hanover Ave

As the business shutdowns and stay-at-home advisories associated with the COVID-19 outbreak have gone into effect, the streets are very quiet with very few moving vehicles, and only a smattering of social distancing locals walking around. See photos from this unusually quiet time here.

Councilor Edwards Proposes Using Community Preservation Act Funds For Emergency Rental Relief

City Councilor Lydia Edwards, who is also the Chair of the Boston City Council Committee on Housing and Community Development, is proposing a reallocation of $2 million of Community Preservation Act revenue to an emergency rental voucher program to provide relief for residents economically impacted by COVID-19. Read more here.

Speak For The Trees Branches Out With “No Need To LEAF The House” Webcast On Urban Forests

 Speak for the Trees, an organization that aims to improve the size and health of the urban forest in the greater Boston area, recently “branched out” by hosting an online reception to talk about the different ways trees and other forms of nature can be better integrated in the City. Read more here.

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