Construction is happening all over the city, with cranes and excavators constantly moving dirt and metal to create new developments. Now, City Councilor Ed Flynn is calling for a hearing regarding construction hours and weekend work.

One of the many construction sites across the city, Winthrop Square.

Flynn, who represents District 2 including Downtown, Chinatown, the South End and South Boston, requested the hearing during the regular city council meeting Wednesday afternoon after receiving calls from residents about the issue.

He wants to use the hearing as a way to get further clarification on the guidelines. He said he has seen construction going on over the weekends and companies are supposed to receive a $300 fine if that happens.

“I want clarification on what you can do and what you can’t do,” he said. “A lot of residents have complained to me and are concerned about the hours some companies are working.”

Councilor Kim Janey applauded the motion.

“It’s affecting the quality of life for many of the residents we represent,” she said. “It’s a very important issue.”

She said it also impacts parking and noise issues in communities given the large amount of development that is happening across the city.

In other news, Councilor Michelle Wu requested a hearing on corporate tax break transparency. Currently, organizations that receive tax breaks do not have to disclose whether they have fulfilled commitments they agreed to.

“Cities across the country are having conversations on what it means to offer incentives and tax breaks,” said Wu.

Wu wants to take a closer look at the recent tax breaks that have been given out and see if those companies are refilling their promises. She said the city is working with organizations that have advised other cities on this issue.

Councilor Lydia Edwards agreed with Wu. “The theme this year is transparency of where our money is going,” she said.

Edwards believes companies should be fined annually if they do not fulfill their commitments. 

“Silence should not be golden for these companies,” she stated. “They should not be rewarded if they forget to do something they are supposed to do.”

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