First in War & His Countrymen’s Hearts: Dr. Joseph Warren
Author Christian DiSpigna’s first Boston area appearance on new book about revolutionary leader killed in Battle of Bunker Hill

A prominent Boston physician, Dr. Joseph Warren was a key force in America’s revolutionary movement. He is responsible for setting Paul Revere on his famous ride, served in the Sons of Liberty with such leaders as John Hancock and Samuel Adams, and made the ultimate sacrifice for the cause when—although commissioned a Major General—he volunteered to fight alongside soldiers in the Battle of Bunker Hill.

On Monday, June 10 at 7:00 p.m., The West End Museum will host author Christian DiSpigna reading from and discussing his new book, “Founding Martyr: The Life and Death of Dr. Joseph Warren, the American Revolution’s Lost Hero.” DiSpigna will focus on newly discovered Warren material culture pieces, artifacts, and primary source documents. He will deconstruct the many Warren legends and explore his resistance activities between 1765-1775. A donation of $10 is suggested for attendees, but free to West End Museum members.

DiSpigna graduated with a degree in history from Columbia University where he began his research on Warren 20 years ago. To immerse himself in 18th century history, DiSpigna moved to Williamsburg, Virginia, volunteered for the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, and worked closely with many period scholars.

Christian DiSpigna

“We are very pleased to have Christian DiSpigna reveal new findings in the story of Joseph Warren,” said Museum Executive Director Duane Lucia. “Warren influenced the founders of MGH, a West End institution, and the residents of West Boston had a clear view of the Battle of Bunker Hill.”

Warren’s death in that battle galvanized the Patriot forces and is memorialized in John Trumbull’s renowned paintings, “The Death of General Warren at the Battle of Bunker’s Hill.” According to the MFA, where the version commissioned by the good doctor/Major General’s family now hangs, Warren “was so idolized that in the decade following his death, there were more towns and streets named after him than after George Washington.

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1 COMMENT

  1. The Warren building at the Massachusetts General Hospital is named after Dr. Joseph Warren’s nephew Dr. John Collins Warren.
    Even though Dr. Joseph Warren died at Bunker Hill his legacy lives on in Boston’s West End.

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