Mayor Marty Walsh gave the State of the City address on Tuesday, January 15 at Symphony Hall in Boston. 

Walsh compared Boston’s growing success to the struggles the nation is facing as a whole. “The state of our city is strong, but I’m concerned about the state of our union,” said Walsh. 

Mayor Martin Walsh giving his address

“What we do in Boston can change this country,” he added. “Instead of building walls, let’s show them how to build bridges.” 

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Walsh highlighted Boston’s progress on the issues of affordable housing, climate change and infrastructure, criticizing Washington for ignoring them. 

“A government that’s supposed to be ‘of the people, by the people, for the people’ is shut down,” he said.

Walsh revealed that he will visit Washington D.C. with Governor Charlie Baker to show what “working together” looks like.

Unemployment in Boston is 2.4 percent, which is the lowest ever recorded for the city. Walsh announced that his administration is launching a mobile economic development center to help expand Boston’s job growth specifically for women and minorities. 

“We’re serious about growing our middle class,” Walsh said. “We’ll create 1,000 new homeowners in the next five years.”

Violent crime in Boston is down 25 percent and police have removed 4,000 guns off the streets, noted Walsh.

He also shared that the city is a finalist to host the 2020 NCAAP convention.

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3 COMMENTS

  1. I think Mayor Walsh & Governor Baker should provide housing for Elderly & separate the Elderly from Drug
    Addicts who are on Methadone. Our Seniors deserve more than this. It is an absolute disgrace to think the
    City has not provided separate housing for both. We have more construction & buildings going up at an
    extremely fast rate & hopefully someone in the City or State will get it.

    • I could be wrong but I believe, if they want Federal HUD funding, that’s the mandate. Seniors and those with disabilities (regardless of age) live together. And some addicts are disabled in the eyes of the Fed…it’s been that way for many years. So it’s more of a funding issue.

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