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A victim of the Seaport District’s new development, Anthony’s Pier 4 held a “last call” closing gathering for staff and friends this week.

Having once attracted up to 3,000 nightly dinner patrons, the landmark restaurant has seen its business decline significantly in recent years. In addition to tax problems, the waterfront institution lost out to competition from newer dining options such as the Liberty Wharf restaurant complex (Globe article). Anthony’s Pier 4 peaked in the 1980’s and was once the place to be. Famous guest photos adorn the walls including those of Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton, Steve McQueen, Joe DiMaggio, Willie Mays, Frank Sinatra, Johnny Carson, Richard Nixon, Judy Garland, Alfred Hitchcock, Ginger Rogers, Julie Child and Jack Nicholson. (Yes, Whitey Bulger was also a regular but he’s not on the wall.)

The Northern Avenue lot will soon feature a 21-story tower, with apartments and ground floor retail stores. Anthony’s Pier 4 closing follows that of nearby Jimmy’s Harborside, another old school Seaport institution. Anthony’s Pier 4 owner, Michael Athanas, son of founder Anthony Athanas, has been quoted saying his family will consider opening a smaller restaurant in the Seaport.

Photos by Bruce McCue.

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3 COMMENTS

  1. I really hope they DO open another, even if smaller, restaurant in the Seaport. It’s sad to see what happened to this 40-year Boston legend. New is fine, but Tradition is necessary to a city!!!!

  2. Oh well I worked there for a few months in 2010 and they treated their staff horribly . They are definitely stuck in the 60’s . Only care about money nothing more

    • I firmly disagree. The Athanas family demand hard work and high standards. I am proud to have been a member of the waitstaff for a period of years in the early 2K’s. I tell everyone what a great man Anthony Sr. was, and how proud I was to work for his sons.

      I always felt fairly treated. Of course you have to be willing to work to earn the respect of such a great man and his family. The “employee” who worked a few months in 2010 has likely worked at a number of restaurants “for a few months.”

      As for them being “stuck in the 60’s” perhaps the country would be in a better place if more employers were stuck there. It’s about personal responsibility.

      I’m waaaaay off on a tangent here. All respect and gratitude to the Athanas family. Not “easy” to work for, but worth it. I learned much, and have many great memories.

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