Click here for slide presentation.

A group of senior civil engineering students at Northeastern University presented their final study on the controversial issues surrounding the potential redesign of the North End’s Hanover Street. The well-attended public meeting was held at the Nazzaro Community Center on April 18, 2012. The meeting was jointly sponsored by two neighborhood groups, the North End / Waterfront Neighborhood Council, NEWNC, and the North End / Waterfront Residents’ Association, NEWRA.

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The team analyzed ideas that have been previously vetted and new unconventional methods used in other cities to complement the past, current, and future needs of the North End from a transportation infrastructure perspective. The Senior Capstone “Essential Engineering” team project is a required course, culminating the students’ academic and co-operative experience. The project was assigned and overseen by Northeastern’s Dr. Daniel Dulaski, PhD, PE. Participating from Northeastern was Matt Walsh,  Oliver Nowalski, Rodrigo Alonso, Matt Ford, Steve Leeber and Steve Curtin.

The project was not sponsored by the City of Boston and the recommendations are simply ideas for discussion. The primary issues addressed include vehicle and pedestrian traffic congestion as a result of double parking, crowded sidewalks, valet parking, commercial deliveries and a mix of stakeholders: residents, businesses and tourists. A number of recommendations were made regarding traffic flow, resident and visitor parking as well as sidewalk issues. Click here for slide presentation.

In order to split up the videos from the lengthy meeting, the first video (above) includes the presentation from the Northeastern engineering students. The second video (below) is the Q&A session with residents, business owners and public officials including City Councilor Sal LaMattina, State Rep. Aaron Michlewitz and Boston’s Commissioner of Transportation, Thomas Tinlin.

Related post:
Chronicle, TV5 segment on the Hanover St. one-way traffic proposal and neighborhood reaction.

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