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Boston Police District A-1 provided an update on recent neighborhood crime incidents, summarized below, at the January 2017 North End Public Safety Meeting. The figures below cover the last 30 days period.

2016 Crime Incident Review

-City-wide: Down 12% (larcenies & auto thefts are down).
-District A-1: Down 2%.

*2,591 Part 1 Crimes in District A-1 in 2016 (a 10-year low).

-Several crime categories were below the 10-year average or were at a 10-year low.
-1420 larcenies + 455 larcenies from MV = ~ 72% of all Part 1 crimes.
-2420 arrests in District A-1.
-77,000 911 calls.
-10,000 incident reports.

-District A-1 is probably the busiest District in Boston because it consists of 11 different downtown neighborhoods.

Latest Crime Stats (~ early December ’16 to ~ early January ’17):

-Robberies (1):

12/24 @ 11.00am: Citizen’s Bank on Hanover St. was robbed of $1980 (in various denominations). Robber handed a note to the teller. No weapon(s). Suspect is a white male, 5’9, age 40’s to 50’s, with a covered-up appearance.

-Aggravated Assaults (2):

-12/4 @ 464 Hanover St. @ 2.00am: Uber driver was stopped on a street. Driver of car behind Uber car pulled out a possible gun, pointed it at Uber driver and fled.

-12/20 @ 185 Fulton St. @ 1.30pm: Person was stabbed in a unit of a building. Victim knew suspect. Both were cut. Suspect identified, located in Revere, was hiding in a shed behind a friend’s house and was arrested. View separate post for more information.

-Auto Theft (1):
-96 Salem St.: Car was left running in front of The Wild Duck. 2007 Toyota was stolen.

-Larcenies (5):
-9 Noyes Place: Package theft.
-99 Prince St.: Shoes were stolen.
-79 Prince St.: Marc Jacobs purse (valued @ $220) was stolen.
-12/22 @ 8 Margaret St.: Drum set was left in apartment building hallway. Tenant returned to building wand drum set was gone.
-109 Salem St.: Backpack was taken from the area where employees keep their belongings. Suspect has been identified.

-Larceny from Motor Vehicle (2):

-12/24 @ 111 Richmond St. @ 3.15am: Laptop computer, credit cards, iPod, etc. stolen. Car doors may have been left unlocked to begin with…

-12/29 @ 3 Garden Court: Coins and iPod missing. No forced entry.

-Arrest (1):

12/11 @ 111 Atlantic Ave. @ 2.55am: Drunk man was banging on wrong doors and wouldn’t stop. Arrested for trespassing.

David Marx is a neighborhood public safety liaison. North End Public Safety Meetings are held on the first Thursday of the month, 6:00 p.m. at the Nazzaro Center, 30 N. Bennet Street. All are welcome to attend and bring their questions to Boston Police District A-1.

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6 COMMENTS

  1. Where are the Cameras on these properties? Anyone who owns property should have a camera,
    not only for the sake of damages that can be done to property, but to protect their tenants,

  2. The ideal is to install cameras on properties; on storefronts; in alleys. The cost is very high, sometimes up to $1,000 per system. Many people are opposed due to lack of privacy. Theft occurs anyway…..thieves somehow know how to enter under ‘radar’ or how to disengage the system. Pros and cons, as always. In a city this question has been debated for years….so far it has not deterred wrongdoing. Suburbs and the country are well protected by lights and cameras. It works.

  3. I know it works, it has been proven over & over again. You can see atleast 4 different locations of
    the building at one time. I think that is pretty good, especially at a $1,000 or a little more to
    put the system in, No Monthly Costs.

  4. Installation cost is only part of it. If the goal is to prevent an offense, a big issue is monitoring. Who will do it? The landlord? A security service? Where will they do it from? How will the video feed get piped to the monitoring location? How and where will it get stored?
    If you are not monitoring 24×7 live, then you are left looking at recordings after the fact and this is only helpful if the camera position, quality of image, lighting, etc. are ideal enough to make a positive ID and take some legal action against the person.
    I used to have a camera outside my apartment. A couple of times that I was approached by people who had bikes stolen, the best I could do it tell them exactly when it was stolen and not much more.

  5. Mark, the reward is worth the risk. The recorder I am talking about records for 1 Month & and
    shows everyone who enters the building, which is especially important when deliveries are being
    made.

    The U.S. Postal carrier claimed he put a package behind the lock door in the building, he was
    on the camera, lied & just threw it in the building. Someone came in the building, saw the
    package & the camera, then came back in the building, this time with a hood on & robbed the
    package.

    The sophistication of the camera depends on the Landlord. The rents are outrageous in the
    No. End & a Camera is a necessity, not a luxury. One of the buildings on Salem St. across from
    Bova’s got their man due to the Camera in the Building.

    Some kind of Camera is better than nothing at all. Where there is a will there is always a Way.

  6. Not all cameras are equal. I saw someone stealing my property on a camera, but could not make out the face well enough to report it to police.

Comments are closed.